Archive for the ‘Features/Interviews’ Category

Komikon 2012: Trese 5 Preview

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On October - 25 - 2012

The 2012 year-end Komikon is this Saturday, and while I hope Rocket Kapre readers have all added Mythspace to their pull lists, there are a lot of great new titles coming out, so best hit the ATMs before hitting the Bayanihan Center. One of the most eagerly anticipated releases is, of course, Trese Book 5: Midnight Tribunal, by the team of Budjette Tan and Kajo Baldisimo. Budjette was kind enough to provide us a sneak preview of the volume, where we see hapless “morgue man” (and star of Budjette’s Trese story in “Alternative Alamat” ) Spunky in a bit of a pickle, and see the Trese once again shooting down the (awesome) ideas of the Kambal. Plus, some concept art!

TRESE 5: Midnight Tribunal
ISBN: 971-05451-8-3
Creators: Budjette Tan and Kajo Baldisimo
SRP: P150.00

“In a city where the aswang control everything that is illegal and where ancient gods seek to control everything else, enforcing the law can be a very difficult task.

When crime takes a turn for the weird, the police normally call Alexandra Trese. Lately, it seems like others have been taking that call.

Trese must confront these supernatural crime-fighters and bring order back to the city, before the underworld attempts to seek balance in its own way.”

Mythspace Mondays: Advance Reviews

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On October - 22 - 2012

For the three Mondays of October before the Komikon, I’ll be talking about my newest comic book project, “Mythspace: Liftoff”. The #0 issue will be available at the Komikon on Oct.27. The first Mysthspace Monday was a look into the concept behind Mythspace, the second was about the way we re-imagined folklore creatures as aliens, and today we feature some advance reviews.

Last week I began to send out digital review copies of Mythspace: Liftoff #0 to bloggers/critics/reviewers, and a few have been kind enough to post their impressions of our zero issue online. So today I’ll let other people do the talking… it should be patently obvious by now that I love what our team has been doing, but does that translate to the impartial reader?

Short answer: YES. (So far!)

 

The most recent is from none other than Noel Pascual, the co-creator of the wonderful Crime Fighting Call Center Agents comic. Here’s an excerpt from his review, the full text of which is here:

Koi Carreon’s art is amazing. As I was browsing through the pages the first time, it’s the character design that really stood out. There’s quite a bit of a manga influence in there but the human characters— from the lead character to the secondary characters (especially the secondary characters!)— all look quite Pinoy. In a story dealing with Pinoy myths, that goes a long way when it comes to adding to the overall effectiveness of the piece.

The plotting really works, going from flashback to present day without confusing the reader. The scenes picked enhance the drama of the story without crossing into melodrama. The rebellious teen who is our lead also doesn’t come close to crossing the line into being an unsympathetic character. Chikiamco also manages to provide his life history without sounding like it’s being done for the sake of dumping info onto the reader. In Liftoff as well as in the other stories, we get a sense that this is a fully realized world, with one element resonating with the next.

The first one is from EK over at Jumper Cable:

“Collectively the comics are all presented on a professional level rarely seen outside of the Sacred Mountain, Komikero, Gunship Revolution, and Point Zero groups. Some of the best inking and detail work among the recent komiks releases are here — and I’ve just seen partial results. The typesetting for the dialogue balloons are grammar-corrected and nearly faultless. The paneling is also professional, at par with the best of the Western comics.

On the script level, the two presented stories are as unique from each other as adobo and sinigang, even if they are made by the same cook. Be assured that there is much variety expected among the six presented stories, that it would not be boring even if they were all from the same writer. Both given stories are paced without a glitch, with a clear understanding of writing in general and the comic medium in particular. The author’s hand in the development process is also visible. There is almost no useless panel, and it is clear that the illustrators understand what to illustrate and how.”

The second is from Francis at Hawkersmag.com:

“Just enough information is given about the main character, Ambrosio, leaving a lot of room for speculation and anticipation of what’s to come.

Although I tend to stray a bit away from angst-ridden teenagers, reasons for Ambrosio’s anger are justified, and it would be interesting to see how his character has changed now that his whole worldview has turned itself over.

There is scarce dialogue, which makes for very efficient story-telling. Chikiamco’s dialogue does what it is intended to do: move the plot forward and reveal character. It doesn’t get in the way of the action and suspense that spills throughout the pages, and that’s a very good thing when it comes to pacing.”

Thanks to both EK and Francis! We’d love for you all to come by the Rocket Kapre booth this coming Saturday and see for yourselves what Mythspace is all about. If you post your reviews online, let us know and we’ll link to them here on the site.

See you all on Saturday!

Mythspace Monday: The Aliens of Mythspace

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On October - 15 - 2012

For the next three Mondays of October, I’ll be talking about my newest comic book project, “Mythspace: Liftoff”. The #0 issue will be available at the Komikon on Oct.27.

The first Mysthspace Monday was a look into the concept behind Mythspace, and today we go a little into the world building.

I wanted to take some time here to talk about how we re-imagined some of the classic Philippine folklore monsters for the science fiction setting of Mythspace.It also gives me the opportunity to show off some art from Team Mythspace — not that I ever need much of an excuse to do that.

A Kapre and a Human. Art by Koi Carreon.

The Kapre:

“He is as tall as the tree beside which he stands…

His skin is rough, dark, and hairy…

He appears under a new moon and a soft shower.

He smokes a big cigar that doesn’t grow shorter.”

- “The Creatures of Midnight” by Maximo D. Ramos

In Mythspace, the Kapre are the ultimate commandos, equipped with stealth technology and the ability to safely inhale toxins, which helps them minimize the smoke emissions of their projectile weapons. The Kapres are few in number after their home planet was destroyed, but it is known that there is a sizeable contingent on Earth, watching humanity as it sleeps.

Nuno Concept Art by Paul Quiroga

The Nuno:

“The Tagalogs call him matanda sa punso and nuno.

Matanda sa punso means ‘old man of the anthill.’

Nuno means ‘grandfather’ or ‘old man’…

His shirt and pants are red, and he wears a salakot…”

- “The Creatures of Midnight” by Maximo D. Ramos

The Mythspace Nuno stem from a combination of the traits of the traditional Nuno and the Dwende. The Nuno are divided not along racial lines, but along political lines, with factions permanently tinting their skins to symbolize their affiliations. The most important object for a Nuno is his or her “Helm”, which symbolizes that they are worthy of piloting a personal mobile suit, usually called a Bungis.

Early Bungis design, with Nuno pilot to scale, by Paul Quiroga

The Bungis:

“The lives deep in a dark forest.

He looks like a big man but with one eye.

A long tusk sticks out of each side of his mouth.

His name means he is always smirking.”

- “The Creatures of Midnight” by Maximo D. Ramos

It’s easy to see why the Bungis-class mecha of the Nuno were mistaken for one-eyed giants by our ancestors. While coming in a variety of designs, most feature a prominent glass cockpit for the Nuno occupant, and from a distance it does appear to be a gigantic eye. Most humans who found themselves close enough to a Bungis to verify their first impressions did not live to disseminate that information.

Young Tan’gal heroine, early design, by Borg Sinaban

A fully mature “Sixth”, from “An Unfurling of Wings”. Art by Borg Sinaban.

The Tan’gal:

“She is called manananggal by the Tagalogs.

Her name means that she can drop off part of her body.

Her name comes from the Malay word tanggal, ‘to drop off’…

She flies with her arms which she turns into wings.”

- “The Creatures of Midnight” by Maximo D. Ramos

Mythspace’s version of the “manananggal” combines the characteristics of the different self-segmenters in our folklore (the part of the woman-monster which grows wings and flies varies–in some reports, for instance, it’s just the head and spine) into a single entity characterized by an incredible healing factor and a mysterious symbiotic relationship with winged creatures that live within them. The Tan’gal go through distinct phases of maturity, and there is a great difference between a Tan’gal in his or her second decade, and one in his or her fifth.

 

Cover Reveal: Mythspace: Liftoff #0

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On October - 11 - 2012

I couldn’t wait until the next Mythspace Monday, so here’s the cover for Mythspace: Liftoff #0 by the inestimable Koi Carreon. It’s still subject to change, but at the moment, I wouldn’t change a thing. We revealed it last night for those who are part of the official Mythspace Facebook page, so come join us there if you’d like more news about Mythspace, as well as exclusive art.

Mythspace Monday: What is Mythspace?

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On October - 8 - 2012

“You are wise to doubt the tales of your youth…
… but all myths, all monsters, are founded on truth.”

For the next three Mondays of October, I’ll be talking about my newest comic book project, “Mythspace: Liftoff”. The #0 issue will be available at the Komikon on Oct.27.

Back in 2009, when I was first thinking up a name for the blog/imprint, I wanted to have a name that would contain elements of both science fiction and fantasy, while also drawing upon my Filipino heritage. That’s how “Rocket Kapre” was born, and while it started out as just a name, the image that the joining of those two words summoned up within me was so novel, so fun, that the seed of a story was planted inside me. I’d seen our folklore monsters used in modern urban settings, and re-imagined pasts, but I’d never seen them used in a straight up science fiction setting.

Sample page from Borg Sinaban

The more I thought about the idea of “Tikbalangs in Spaaaace”, the more I liked it. I’d read somewhere before that the idea of aliens had, in some ways, taken the place of the monsters from folklore in modern day narratives, and the thought of these monsters, in turn, “usurping” the position of aliens in science fiction, appealed to my sense of reverse colonization.

Nuno concept art from Paul Quiroga

So I did some world building on the side, while working on other projects. Fast forward to 2011, where Koi Carreon, creator of “Marco’s Delivery Service”, approached me with an offer: he had a group of talented artists who wanted to do a science fiction anthology, and they were wondering if I’d be able to help? A chorus of rocket kapres and space tikbalangs screamed “Yes!”

Teaser art from Cristina Rose Chua

That’s how Team Mythspace was born, with myself handling sole writing duties and collaborating with six of the most talented artists I know: Koi Carreon, Borg Sinaban, Jules Gregorio, Mico Dimagiba, Cristina Rose Chua, Paul Quiroga. Mythspace: Liftoff is an anthology, the first of many we hope, of stories that will explore a universe where monsters such as the Nuno, Manananggal, Kapre, and Kataw are in fact alien races with technology far more advanced than are own, each of them players in a galactic power struggle that has humans squarely in the crossfire.

Laho Warlord concept art by Jules Gregorio

While we’re planning to launch the complete anthology next year, at this month’s Komikon (Oct. 27, Bayanihan Center) we will be making Mythspace #0 available. This zero issue will have the first part of the two longest stories in the anthology– Borg’s “An Unfurling of Wings” and the titular “Liftoff” story from Koi–as well as preview pages from the other 4 stories, and excerpts from a special “diary” that we  may not have the space to include in the final anthology. So not only will you get an advance look at “Mythspace: Liftoff”, but material that will not be available anywhere else.

Preview art from Koi Carreon.

For the next few Mondays, I’ll be talking more about Mythspace. If you’d like more regular updates, please visit our Facebook page — I’ll be uploading content there more frequently as we get closer to the Komikon.

 

Kapre concept art from Mico Dimagiba.

 

 

 

Last month, Lethe Press published “Lauriat: A Filipino-Chinese Speculative Fiction Anthology”, edited by Charles Tan (and with a story from yours truly). Charles took a moment from his busy schedule to say a few words about the anthology.

“Lauriat” is an anthology of Filipino-Chinese speculative fiction that is being published by a U.S.-based publisher. How’d the idea for the antho come about, and what let to it being published outside the Philippines?

I was brainstorming possible anthology ideas when I realized no one yet has done a speculative fiction anthology based on Filipino-Chinese culture, which has its own set of complexities, relationships, and drama. Lethe Press has always been supportive of my work, and the publisher was willing to publish the anthology and pay the contributors.

When you say “Filipino-Chinese”, what do you mean by that?

The problem when people ask “Are you Filipino?”, “Are you Chinese?”, or something else (Are you Singaporean, American, Japanese, Australian, Indian, etc.) is that it’s usually misses out on the question whether we’re talking about nationality, ethnicity, etc. And it’s a question that comes up year after year, especially in the Philippines where there’s controversy over our athletes, our politicians, etc.

One personal bias I’ve experienced is how many Filipinos don’t consider the Chinese community here as Filipinos, even if we’re part of their culture. Many recognized Filipino icons for example has roots in the Filipino-Chinese community: Jollibee, SM, Pancit Canton, Taho, etc.

But when the term Filipino-Chinese is usually encountered, it usually means, at the very least, someone whose nationality is Filipino, and has had Chinese roots somewhere. I leave the last part ambiguous, whether this means to be part Chinese in culture, heritage, ethnicity, legacy, etc.

What aspects of Filipino and Chinese heritage would you say complement, or are similar to, each other? What aspects cause friction?

I think again, there is a misconception here. The “Chinese” in the Philippines aren’t the Chinese in China. The two have entirely different values, although it’s probably a misconception (even among the Filipino-Chinese community) that they do. There is a difference in the mindset between the Filipino-Chinese and non-Chinese Filipinos, but I don’t think isolating this and that element as “Chinese” and “Filipino” would be too easy.

For example, I think both Filipino-Chinese and non-Chinese Filipinos are fiercely loyal to people they consider their kin. They will fight to the death for them and take their side in a lot of arguments. On the other hand, this is also the source of conflict: for some Filipino-Chinese, those not “Chinese” aren’t as respectable (hence the taboo against marrying someone not Chinese), while many Filipinos consider those not ethnically Filipino to be against them (hence some enmity against the Filipino-Chinese community whom they consider separate from them).

There’s a lot to talk about with regards to the subject and unfortunately discussing each point would be too long for the interview.

Are there any unique challenges or opportunities that present themselves to Filipino-Chinese authors writing in English?

In terms of market, well, there is always the problem of finding a market in the Philippines that’s not limited to your cultural heritage (just look at the output of our fiction books vs. that in which we import and clearly the latter sells better than the former). As for the craft, there is the hurdle of writing for what is a multilingual culture and condensing it into a single language (English), when that isn’t always how we speak (we speak in Tag-lish, Chi-Tag-lish, and Chinese-Tagalog). Which isn’t that unique (it’s the same plight a lot of Filipino writers face), but remains there nonetheless.

Can you tell me a bit about a few of the stories you selected for the anthology, and go into why you selected them, or what struck you most about them?

I think each story in the anthology has something going for them, either on the craft level, cultural level, personal level, or some combination. What makes me enjoy the first story in the book isn’t what makes me appreciate the last. But I did want every story to factor in that this is a Filipino-Chinese anthology, so I wanted the culture to be a factor: some factor into the plot significantly (some stories for example dealt with the taboo of non-Chinese romance) while others are in the background.

Personally I leave it for readers to decide what they think is best. And this is an anthology, so I don’t expect every story to strike a chord in them, but hopefully a few do. I tried to encompass a lot of subjects and genres. There’s horror. There’s urban fantasy. There’s historical fantasy.

What does “Lauriat” have to offer to Filipino-Chinese readers? What about to those unfamiliar with the culture, or even with Philippine or Chinese culture separately?

First, I think Lauriat features a lot of terrific stories–which is subject to my bias of course. Second, it’s written by talented authors that the rest of the world hasn’t heard of. Third, while there’s some speculative fiction being written about Filipinos, not a lot of them deal with the Filipino-Chinese experience, and I hope the anthology rectifies that. Fourth, regardless of your knowledge about either culture, I think the stories stand well on their own.

What has the early feedback on the book been like?

For me the biggest challenge is getting the word out. I’d like to thank Publishers Weekly for reviewing it in their publication (http://christinevlao.blogspot.com/2012/06/publishers-weekly-reviews-lauriat.html) as well as Locus for mentioning it under their New Books (http://www.locusmag.com/Monitor/2012/08/new-books-14-august/). As far as feedback is concerned, a lot of the reviews are on Goodreads (http://www.locusmag.com/Monitor/2012/08/new-books-14-august/).

Where can the book be purchased?

Here’s a direct link to the Amazon page (http://www.amazon.com/Lauriat-Filipino-Chinese-Speculative-Fiction-Anthology/dp/1590212541) but it should can be ordered through bookstores and the eBook is available in a lot of online retailers such as Smashwords, Weightless Books, Wizard’s Tower Books, etc.

YA Author Cage Match Mechanics for the Kwentillion YARC

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On July - 18 - 2012

Cage Match Registration Sheet Sample

 

You already know the panelists for the 1st Kwentillion Young Adult Readers Carnival, this Saturday, July 21, so now it’s time to shed some light on that first event: the Young Adult Author Cage Match! *cue ominous music*

No, sadly, this doesn’t involve throwing J.K. Rowling, Suzanne Collins, and Stephenie Meyer into a steel octagon and watching them slug it out using only hardcover copies of their books (advantage to Rowling, obviously). What it is, is a chance for readers to sing the praises of their favorite authors, and in so doing, maybe introduce them to other readers as well. It’s also a chance that we’d like to give first to readers in high school or college – while the readership of young adult books encompasses all ages, we’d love to hear more from teen and near-teen readers. So here,s how it’ll go down:

Interested participants are encouraged to arrive at 1PM exactly – or better, a little earlier – in order to register. At the registration table, we’ll have sign-up sheets for the author candidates. Choose your favorite, the author you’re willing to go to bat for, and sign your name on the upper right.

Here are the authors you can “defend” during the Cage Match:

  • TAMORA PIERCE
  • LAUREN OLIVER
  • EOIN COLFER
  • LAUREN KATE
  • RICK YANCEY
  • MELISSA MARR
  • PHILIP PULLMAN
  • TERRY PRATCHETT
  • RICK RIORDAN
  • CASSANDRA CLARE
  • PSEUDONYMOUS BOSCH
  • BRANDON MULL
  • PATRICK NESS
  • SCOTT WESTERFELD
  • URSULA K. LEGUIN
  • ALYSON NOËL
  • HOLLY BLACK
  • LIBBA BRAY
  • GARTH NIX
  • C.S. LEWIS
  • NEIL GAIMAN
  • ISABEL ALLENDE
  • JAMES PATTERSON
  • SHERRILYN KENYON
  • J.K. ROWLING
  • STEPHENIE MEYER
  • SUZANNE COLLINS

After we’ve given enough time for registration, we’ll select the four or five authors with the highest number of supporters, and those will serve as the “Teams” for the Cage Match. (If there are fewer than eight supporters in each team, we’ll give others an opportunity to shift allegiances from non-participating author candidates, in order to fill those slots).

The Cage Mage will occur in a series of rounds. Each round, the facilitator will name a contest category, and, after a one minute period to strategize, each Team’s representative will be given two minutes to explain why their author is the best in that category. At the end of each round, the judges will determine and award points to the winner, and the Team with the most points at the end of seven rounds will crown its author as the Best YA Author (of the Day). Winners get first pick of the Kwentillion proof pages we’re giving away.

Each Team’s Author will be evaluated on the basis of four major categories: Character; Plot; World; Life Influence. Being judged the winner in each of these categories gives the Team 2 points. Points can also be scored in three minor categories: Book Title; Opening Scene; Book Quote. Here’s a more detailed explanation of each category:

* Character: What do you love about the characters your Author has created? What about these characters inspires you, entertains you, speaks to you?

* Plot: What makes your Author’s stories such page turners? Is he/she a master of pacing, or of plot twists, or of well-deserved happy endings?

* World: What makes you want to step into the universes your Author has created? How does he/she make these settings come alive, become real, yet still be different from your world outside the book?

* Life Influence: How have your Author’s stories/characters/worlds inspired, entertained, or otherwise made a difference in your lives?

* Book Title: What do you love about the titles of your Author’s books? Which is your favorite title? Why that one?

* Opening Scene: Which is your favorite opening scene from your Author’s books? Why that one?

* Quotes: Choose a favorite quote from one of your Author’s books that best exemplifies why you love him/her. (You can read it out loud – no need to memorize it.) Explain why.

Gunship Revolution is an art and design group currently making waves in the country and abroad, with some of the top local talent in the field today. They’ve been running a series of workshops–dubbed Creation Live!–for the benefit of aspiring creators, and their latest one, Sellswords, will veer away from art tips and into the murky-yet-rewarding world of freelancing. I asked Gunship’s Marthy Angue to give us a little preview of what he’s got in store for Sellswords, and he graciously agreed to write a guest post on the topic for Rocketkapre.

FREELANCING: THE UNEXPECTED UPSIDES OF LIVING DANGEROUSLY
By M. Arguelles Angue of Gunship Revolution

The smart thing, of course, would be to not quit your regular job. Steady work means steady pay and most companies do provide some semblance of insurance in case your boss decides to toss you off the building after being caught playing Angry Birds on company time once too often. That’s the kind of good, clear-minded sense that gives parents confidence that their children aren’t throwing their lives away. Conversely, walking out of your nine-to-fiver (or its night-shift equivalent) to pursue freelancing is pretty much the most spot-on illustration possible for that old bromide “out of the frying pan, into the fire.” Stomping off, especially in this economy, is like breaking free from a bag of Jalapeno-flavored Cheetos and realizing after that glorious split-second of liberty– “oh snap, I’m gonna get eaten out here.”

Then again, it could also be noticed that history is seldom made by people doing “the smart thing”. “The smart thing” was never to go past the horizon on your moldy, rat-infested ship nor was it ever attempting to fly using a pair of highly-flammable wings propelled through the air by explosions. “Adventure” has always been taking the worst bits of the human experience and insisting that there was something in the journey that made it all worth it. The rogue little cheeto could have escaped to go on a Pixar-esque adventure or it could have been eaten but either fate, one might be led to believe, would be preferable to staying inside the bag. In the same way, Freelancing is made more bearable when it is seen as an adventure. The problems don’t stop being problems but you may find that some harrowing experiences are worth the trouble after all. To note a few:

1.) Freelancing is a Voyage of Self Discovery

You’re no longer an employee. Heck, you’re not even self-employed (you have clients, after all.) You are now both a product and a service primed up to be sold for the highest bidder. When you’re trying to come up with ways of promoting yourself, you are pretty much indulging on one of the fundamental themes of human existence: “Who Am I?” You can either make this a matter of leveraging your education or your work experience and making a four-page CV out of it for your email blast. Or you can promote yourself as being more than a list of statistics and a glossy 2×2. Whichever rocks your boat, as they say.

Read the rest of this entry »

RP612Fic 2012: The Stories

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On June - 18 - 2012

Another year, another #RP612fic… is what I’d like to say, but the rate at which our twitter-fiction celebration grows from year to year never ceases to astonish me. We even made the news this time, with GMA and ABS-CBN and Katipunan Magazine each doing stories on #RP612fic, and listing their favorite stories.We were also named Hashtag of the Week by the Philippine Star Supreme:

It’s reached the point where I can’t do my usual screengrab-and-paste aggregation of all the stories. What I’ve done instead is turned the search results for #RP612fic into a PDF–a 506 PAGE PDF, to be precise. It’s not as pretty as a screen capture, but my poor, old, PC just couldn’t take the size of the image, and it would take me too long to efficiently cu it by batches.

Before I give out the link to the PDF though, a few disclaimers: it includes every instance that #RP12fic was used in a tweet over the last few days, and while most of these are stories, some are not. This is also a raw list, as again it wasn’t feasible for me to pick and choose, so there are some bad eggs here, personal attacks masquerading as fic, or “jokes” in bad taste fueled by an ugly racism… but these are in the minority. A few bits of adult content – nothing raunchy – and a ton of slash fic, so if you’re offended by that, proceed with caution.

As a whole though, there was a lot of humor in this batch, and most people seemed to have a lot of fun looking sideways at history – and it shows. Here’s the PDF.

Here are around 30 of my personal favorites. Once again, thank you all for participating, and see you next year!

 

There are more Philippine Dr. Who fans on Twitter than I thought. A *lot* of WHO-related tweets…Who else would wear a mobile suit?

And then we were all obliterated, Independence Day style.
Ol’ Douglas is fast catching up to Magellan as the most popular foreign character in #RP612fic.

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RP612Fic 2012 – Celebrate Independence Day with Twitter Fiction

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On June - 7 - 2012

This coming Tuesday is June 12, Independence Day here in the Philippines, an occasion which I, and a growing number of Filipino writers, like to commemorate with a little something we call #RP612fic.

For anyone lat to the party, here’s all you need to know:

  • What is #RP612fic? It’s Filipino authors coming together on Twitter to create tweet-length stories (130 characters, because you need to leave space for the hashtag) and sending them out into the wild with the #RP612fic hashtag. When the event is over, I’ll collate all submissions into a single post here on the site.
    • What’s a Hashtag? It’s a word/code you put in your tweet after the “#”. It acts as a label of sorts and makes it easier for me to find all participating stories.
  • When does this take place? At least once a year on Independence Day, but starting in 2009 we also do it to participate in other events, such as a Blog Action Day. For Independence Day 2012, I’ll be looking for stories sent from 6PM on June 11, to 6AM of June 13.
  • What kind of stories should I submit? For Independence Day, I’d love to see alternative history stories, but it’s not like I’m going to tell you to delete your 130 character realist micro fiction opus.
  • What if I’m not on Twitter and I want to participate? Just send me your tweet length stories via rocketkapre[at]gmail.com and I’ll try to tweet them or at least include them in my compilation.

Spread the word! For those who want to see the previous RP612fic stories, you can check out these links:

(Image of old school Philippine soldiers from Filipiniana.net)

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Rocket Kapre is an imprint of Eight Ray Sun Publishing Inc. (a new Philippine-based publisher), dedicated to bringing the very best of Philippine Speculative Fiction in English to a worldwide audience by means of digital distribution. More info can be found at our About section at the top of the page.

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