Archive for the ‘Slider’ Category

Call for Submissions: THE SEA IS OURS: TALES OF STEAMPUNK SOUTHEAST ASIA

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On February - 3 - 2014

Like steampunk? Like representation of Southeast Asain cultures in steampunk? Then boy, do we have the anthology for you. Jaymee Goh and Joyce Chng are putting together an anthology called THE SEA IS OURS: Tales of Steampunk Southeast Asia for Rosarium Publishing. You can find the submission guidelines here, and you have until the end of June to submit. Get to it!

 

Cover and Table of Contents: Outpouring – Typhoon Yolanda Relief Anthology

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On January - 20 - 2014

 

Many parts of the country are still reeling from the effects of Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda, and relief efforts still continue. One such project is “Outporing”, a Yolanda Relief anthology edited by Dean Francis Alfar. The book will be a vailable soon, but in the meantime, here’s the TOC and the cover.

“The Wordeaters” by Rochita Loenen-Ruiz
“Invisible Empire of Ascending Light” by Ken Scholes
“The Photograph” by Veronica Montes
“A Moment in Time” by Charie D. La Marr
“A Gentlemen’s Agreement” by Susan S.Lara
“X” by Karissa Chen
“Cunning Syncronicity” by Berrien C. Henderson
“Godsend” by Joel Pablo Salud
“Ondoy” by Laura McPhee-Browne
“Rescuing the Rain God” by Kate Osias
“The Wish Head” by Jeffrey Ford
“Flash Forward” by Jhoanna Lynn B. Cruz
“Where Sky and Sea Meet” by Dan Campbell
“Arrow” by Barry King
“Finding Those Who Are Lost” by Celestine Trinidad
“Synchronicity” by Victor Fernando R. Ocampo
“We’re All Stories in the End” by Matthew J. Rogers
“Silverio and the Eidolon” by Vincent Michael Simbulan
“Tinkerers” by Jay Wilburn
“Finding” by David B. Ramirez
“Ikan Berbudi (Wise Fish)” by Jason Erik Lundberg
“Pilar Escheverria” by Cecilia Manguerra Brainard
“Scraps” by Michael Haynes
“Freeborn in the City of Fallacies” by Andrew Drilon
“Storm Warning” by Lilian Csernica
“The Nameless Ones” by Gabriela Lee
“Whispers” by Grant J. McMaster
“Highway Run” by Alexander Marcos Osias
“Black Sun” by Todd Nelsen
“Life at the Lake’s Shore” by Alex Shvartsman
“Aliens” by Fiona Mae Villamor
“Little Italy” by Isa Lorenzo
“Discipline” by Rebecca McFarland Kyle
“Unmaking” by Julie C. Day
“Fresh Fruit” by Yvette Tan
“The Sparrows of Climaco Avenue” by Kenneth Yu
“Gellen’s Retirement Plan” by Tim Sullivan
“When We Were Witches” by Nikki Alfar
“All the Little Gods We Are” by John Grant
“Tuba Knight” by Cesar Miguel G. Escaño

 

Two horror anthologies are launching at the end of November. “Horror: Filipino Fiction for Young Adults”, edited by Dean Francis Alfar and Kenneth Yu, and a print edition of “Demons of the New Year”, edited by Karl de Mesa and Joseph Nacino, both launch officially at5PM on November 29, 2013 at the West Wing Gallery of the Vargas Museum in UP Diliman. Drop by if you have the chance!

The Pinoy Book Drop 2013

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On October - 22 - 2013

Like getting free books? Or, maybe you prefer being the one to spread the love by giving them away? The Filipino Reader Con is holding an event that may tickle your fancy: The Pinoy Book Drop!

Here are the instructions (as seen here):

1. Pick a book (or two, or three, or yes, four!) that you wish to give away, or that’s okay for you to part with, for one reason or another. Make sure to check the pages for important stuff – anything you may have inserted there and forgotten but you may want to hold on to.

2. Download and print the customized bookplates that you’ll find below these instructions. It doesn’t have to be in color – black and white will work just as fine! Paste or stick one bookplate on a clear page or area of the book/s that you wish to give away. Yes, you can sign your name there, too, if you want.

3. Leave or “drop” the book/s in a public place, or basically any place where people are sure to see them: in a café, in the office, at a restaurant, the gym, it’s up to you. (Well, maybe not inside a bookstore, yeah.) You know where someone is likely to see the book/s and pick it up, yes?

4. Before leaving the book/s where you “dropped” them, take a photo. If you’re leaving two or more books, be sure to take note of the date, time, and place where you left each one.

So how is everyone going to know that you have dropped a book somewhere? You can do any of the following:

(a) If you have a Twitter account, just tweet the title of the book, where and when you dropped it, and attach the appropriate photo. If you dropped two or more books, tweet about each title separately.

(b) You can also post about it on Facebook – on your own profile/timeline, if it’s set to public, OR on the Filipino ReaderCon page itself. Same details apply: title of the book, place and date of the drop, and photo. If you’re dropping two or more books, you have the option to include all the books in one go or post about the books individually. It’s up to you.

IMPORTANT: Please use the hashtags #pbdrop and #filreadercon and don’t forget to tag us at @PinoyReaderCon for every tweet!

5. The actual dropping of books will take place for an entire week, from October 21 – 27, but if you have your book/s ready for dropping before then, that’s good too – just go ahead and drop them. We will post another set of instructions for this activity on the third Filipino Friday, October 25th.

6. On the other hand, if you’re one of those who are lucky enough to find a dropped book, we encourage you to tell us all about it, as well! Tweet and Facebook any dropped book that you find – same instructions on using the hashtags #pbdrop and #filreadercon and tagging us at @PinoyReaderCon apply. ;)

Oh, and here are the Pinoy Book Drop bookplates courtesy of the lovely Tina. :)

bookplate1

bookplate2

Additional Instructions: Interested to know who found your book? Just stick or attach a note addressed to your book’s new owner to Tweet or post on Facebook about his/her newest find. As usual, hashtags #pbdrop and #filreadercon and tagging @PinoyReaderCon are encouraged. :)

Got it? Let’s do the Pinoy Book Drop! See you again on the third week of Filipino Fridays! :)

Trese Night Gallery and Book of Murders Launch

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On October - 15 - 2013

Budjette Tan dropped a bombshell over the weekend with two announcements: first,  a one-man art show from Trese co-creator Kajo Baldisimo, at the Crucible Gallery (SM Megamall, Level 4), running from from October 22 until November 3. The exhibit, Kajo’s first one-man show, will feature 13 limited-edition digital prints, featuring the creatures and characters from the award-winning graphic novel Trese,  as well as the original artwork from the recently released illustrated shorty story collection, Stories from the Diabolical.

The second announcement is that, on the official launch of the exhibit on October 26, Budjette and Kajo will also launch a new collection of the first three Trese volumes, called the Book of Murders, with digitally updated art. Looks like Trese fans have a lot to look forward to, even before the new volume arrives.

Discount Code for Lauriat: A Filipino-Chinese Speculative Fiction Anthology

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On September - 26 - 2013

Lauriat, the Filipino-Chinese Speculative Fiction Anthology edited by Charles Tan, is being discounted on Smashwords until October 25. While listed at 6.99 US dollars on the site, just use this coupon code at Smashwords, you can purchase the ebook of Lauriat for $0.99: NG66N. You can read an interview I did with Charles about Lauriat here.

Lauriat was reviewed positively in Publisher’s Weekly, and includes my alternate history story (mentioned in that review) called the “Captain’s Nephew.” It mixes General Jose Ignacio Paua — the Chinese General of the Katipunan — and one of the Philippines’ most famous folklore creatures. Here’s an excerpt:

Batangas.1896.

The forest that covered the slopes of Mount Pico de Loro was thick with dense underbrush and slim, swaying trees whose trunks formed a lattice of rough bark and sharp edges. The trunks were almost invisible beneath the shelter of the forest canopy, deeper lines of black obstructing stray beams of moonlight and frustrating the efforts of one Chinese man. Jose Ignacio Paua swung his bolo once more at a particularly stubborn patch of bamboo, then stopped to wipe his brow. Not for the first time that night, the Katipunero mused that the forest was a decidedly unwelcoming place. This was not, however, an observation that deterred him. Paua was a man accustomed to walking where he was not wanted, in places where he was in danger from far worse than an errant branch.

Of course, there was always the chance that something more sinister than a tree was lurking on this mountain. In fact, that was what Paua was counting on.

After a good three hours of stumbling and hacking his way up the mountainside, Paua eventually emerged onto a flat outcropping within sight of the beak-shaped summit which gave the mountain its name. This high above sea level, the night breeze was cold enough to make Paua shiver, and strong enough to make his queue — his long, braided ponytail — dance. For a moment, the Katipunero looked to the east, and fancied he could see all the way to Imus, and the scowling visage of Pantaleon Garcia.

“This is a fool’s errand,” Pantaleon had told him. “You’re chasing after tuba-fueled nightmares, or some oddly shaped shadow.”

“Shadows don’t smoke cigars,” Paua had replied as he mounted his horse. “I’ll be in the area anyway for recruitment. No harm in taking a look.”

“Of course not. Not for you. Not when there’s an adventure to be had.”

That was partly true. At twenty four years old, Paua still had much of the restless energy which had driven him, six years ago, to leave China for the Philippines. But it was more than that. Paua moved to the very edge of the outcropping and took in the sight of his adopted home. To the south, the mountains of Batangas rose above the rolling green countryside; to the north the island of Bataan was just visible over the water. Pantaleon was his friend, but there was no way that anyone who had lived for forty years in this country could fully understand Paua’s hunger to explore it. 

It was only when Paua reluctantly tore himself away from the view that he realized that he was not alone. A man in dark red clothes leaned against one of the taller trees, a somewhat twisted looking plant with round, low-hanging leaves. The overhanging branches kept most of the man’s face in shadow, but Paua could see enough to identify him as Chinese.

“Are you lost, neighbor?” said the man in red. “You’re a long way from home.”

When Paua made no reply, the other man moved out of the shade of the tree. As the man moved closer, Paua scrutinized his face carefully under the moonlight.

“I could show you the way back down the mountain,” said the man in red. His face was round and ruddy, his smile open and guileless. “I’m on my way back down myself.”

“Oh, I remember you now,” said Paua in Hokkien. “That’s clever.”

The man in red stopped, his expression darkening. “I’m sorry, I did not quite hear you.”

“I was commending you on your ingenuity,” Paua said, shifting back to Tagalog. “I figured it would be difficult to try your usual trick, given that none of my relations would be anywhere near Cavite, let alone this mountain. Taking the face of an almost forgotten cousin and assuming the role of a helpful stranger… that was unexpected.”

The man in red drew a large cigar from his pocket, and placed it between his lips. The tip of the cigar flared, and in that instant the man vanished. In his stead hulked a gangly figure that easily topped seven feet, its arms so long that one hairy hand was at the level of its knobby knees. The other hand still held the cigar, and against the backdrop of the night sky, the dull red light cast the figure’s equine head into relief. 

 

“A hunter.” The Tikbalang’s sigh sounded like a horse’s nicker. “Hunters make for such poor sport. As you will, then. Shall it be salt first? One of your Christian beads? Or simply the business end of your blade?”

“What? No, no.” Paua slowly returned the bolo to the sheath which hung from his waist. “I’m not here to hurt you.”

The Tikbalang whinnied, and gave its head a shake, its long mane trailing behind like a coarse and tangled pennant. “Let us presume for a moment that your intentions have any bearing on what actually happens this night. Why are you here then, banyaga?” 

Paua felt a rush of anger, but fought it down. One did not begin a courtship with threats and bombast. Instead Paua forced a smile and said: “I’m here to recruit you.”

New(ish) Release: Mouths to Speak, Voices to Sing – Stories by Kenneth Yu

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On September - 23 - 2013

I missed plugging this when it came out in August, so time to rectify that: Kenneth Yu, the man behind Philippine Genre Stories, (finally) has a collection of his short stories out. It’s called “Mouths to Speak, Voices to Sing” Stories by Kenneth Yu, and if that title sounds familiar, it’s because that’s the name of Kyu’s story in our first issue of Usok, which is also a part of this collection.It also includes the disturbing short, “Cherry Clubbing” which took 3rd place in the 3rd Philippine Graphic Fiction Awards.

Here’s the list of stories:

  • Mouths to Speak, Voices to Sing
  • The Sparrows of Climaco Avenue
  • The Kiddie Pool
  • When You Let It Go
  • House 1.0
  • Cricket
  • Oplan: Bleach
  • Cherry Clubbing
  • The Concierto of Senor Lorenzo
  • Spider Hunt
  • Little Hands, Little Feet
  • Controller 13
  • All That We May See
  • One Morning at the Bank
  • Lost for Words
  • Beats

And here are the stores where you can buy your digital copy:

Reminder: Nomination Period for the Filipino Readers’ Choice Awards 2013

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On August - 16 - 2013

 

The 3rd Filipino Reader Con is taking place on 9 November 2013, and during the event, the winners of the 2nd Filipino Readers’ Choice Awards will be announced, and I just wanted to take the time to remind everyone that nominations are still open, and will remain so until August 23 ONLY. As stated in the rules, for 2013, the Filipino Readers’ choice awards will be open to books published from January to December 2012, in the following categories:

  • Children’s picture book
  • Chick lit
  • Novel in English
  • Novel in Filipino
  • Comics / Graphic novels
  • Short story anthology
  • Essay anthology
  • Poetry

I can’t stress enough how important it is that as many people as possible nominate (in Stage 1) and participate (during the voting in Stage 2). The Readers’ Choice Awards answers a dire need, because it’s the only annual Philippine literary award in which readers at-large can participate (that I know of — the Komikon Awards are not annual). One of the things I think that we local writers and publishers need to do better is connect with our readership and these awards are a great way for a wide bloc of readers to speak on a single stage (even while singing different tunes, so to speak), and the more people are on that stage, the better it will be at bridging that gap between writers, publishers, and readers.

So do take the time to nominate and vote for the categories that you read. It’s important.

Timothy James Dimacali Interview at Adarna SF

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On August - 6 - 2013

Adarna SF has just posted an interview with Skygypsies writer and Alternative Alamat contributor, TJ Dimacali. (Adarna SF also has a new review of Alternative Alamat here.) Here’s an excerpt, with TJ answering a question aboutthe audience for and nature of Filipino speculative fiction stories:

It’s a fact that we don’t yet have the means to produce our own high technology, and won’t be capable of doing so for at least a generation more to come, if at all.

This means that we’re completely at the mercy of whatever technology lands in our hands from first-world countries. Sure, they’re built and assembled in Asia, but the basic construction paradigms and even the basic marketing strategies stem from people who are of a different cultural milieu and world-view than ours.

And yet, we’ve proven time and again that we are capable of adapting these technologies to suit our needs and to use them in ways that the original designers never even thought of.

This happened a decade ago with SMS, and now with social media. But all of these are after the fact, merely reactionary to the arrival of foreign technologies.

So that’s where speculative fiction —particularly SCIENCE fiction— comes into the picture: it’s a way for us to dream our own future, to empower us with a vision of what we can become. So that we’re more than just blind adopters of foreign technologies.

You can read the full interview here.

Paolo’s New Work: Slammed! Interactive Fiction Game

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On July - 1 - 2013

Hi guys! On the chance that some of you may be interested in my non-specfic work as well, Choice of Games has just released Slammed!, my Interactive Fiction wrestling game,  for iOSAndroidKindle Fire, and, via the Chrome Web Store, Windows, OS X, and Linux. By “Interactive Fiction”, I mean something along the lines of a choose-your-own-adventure gamebook, with statistics, but without dice rolls.

At 250,000 words, give or take, this is easily the longest story I’ve ever written, and you might say it’s my first novel (or first five novels). As I said, it’s not specfic — but really, pro wrestling is as close as you can come to a real life superhero universe. If you enjoy my writing, but don’t watch wrestling, I have it on good authority that you can still enjoy the game — you can try the demo to check the game out, or read the wrestling primer I prepared, for non-fans. In any event, this is a labor of love that I devoted more than half a year of my life to, and I’d love it if Rocket Kapre readers would give it a try, and help me spread the word.

Thank you! Here’s the official press release from Choice of Games:

We’re proud to announce that SLAMMED!, the latest in our popular “Choice of Games” line of multiple-choice interactive-fiction games, is now available for iOSAndroidKindle Fire, and, via the Chrome Web Store, Windows, OS X, and Linux.

Turn a scripted steel-cage wrestling match into a real fight in this 250,000-word interactive novel!

You’ve always dreamed of becoming pro wrestling’s biggest star…but a wrestler’s world is fraught with hardship and betrayal, in and out of the ring. Become a powerhouse, a technician, a high-flier, or focus on your promo skills. There’s more than one road to success.

But none of those roads will be easy. This is a world where your biggest fans are your harshest critics; where the front office is more dangerous than the squared circle; where friends can become enemies with a single heel turn; where, sometimes, the only way to win is to lose, spectacularly.

This is professional wrestling. And you’re about to change it, forever.

Slammed! is an epic interactive professional-wrestling novel by Paolo Chikiamco, where your choices determine how the story proceeds. The game is entirely text-based–without graphics or sound effects–but driven by the vast, unstoppable power of your imagination.

There’s never been a professional wrestling game like this, a game where the outcome of your final match, your choice of opponent, and your relationships affect the ending. When’s the last time you played a pro-wrestling RPG with a “kayfabe” stat?–or where your trash-talking “promo” ability is as important as your core strength and wrestling technique?

  • Enjoy a 250,000-word personal tale of friendship, competition, and revenge.
  • Develop not only your physical abilities, but a favored wrestling style.
  • Become a heroic face, or a villainous heel–or even turn heel.
  • Turn a scripted match into a real fight–and vice versa.
  • Decide when to keep kayfabe, and when to break it.
  • Play as male or female, gay or straight.

We hope you enjoy playing SLAMMED!. We encourage you to tell your friends about it, and recommend the game on StumbleUpon, Facebook, Twitter, and other sites. Don’t forget: our initial download rate determines our ranking on the App Store. Basically, the more times you download in the first week, the better our games will rank.

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About Me

Rocket Kapre is an imprint of Eight Ray Sun Publishing Inc. (a new Philippine-based publisher), dedicated to bringing the very best of Philippine Speculative Fiction in English to a worldwide audience by means of digital distribution. More info can be found at our About section at the top of the page.

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