Let’s Talk Philippine Comics on April 6

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On March - 27 - 2014

To celebrate the Studio Salimbal launch, we’d like to talk about comics. Philippine comics, to be exact. Studio members — this includes Team Mythspace, Mervin Malonzo (Tabi Po), Noel Pascual (Crime Fighting Call Center Agents) and Elbert Or (Bakemono High, and editor of the forthcoming Abangan anthology) — will be joined by other local comic creators for an informal, free-wheeling discussion about the craft, business, and future of comics in the Philippines.

Nothing will be sold at the event, but there will be artists giving free sketches, and the event itself is free. So if you’re a creator who wants to talk shop, an aspiring creator who wants to learn the craft — or if you’re a komiks aficionado, or a comics fan interested in the local scene, or even someone who simply wants to learn about comics in general and the men and women behind them, please do come by. There’s never been a better time to talk about Philippine comics.

Confirmed Writers/Artists: Elbert Or, Noel Pascual, Mervin Malonzo, Tintin Pantoja, Paolo Chikiamco, Butch Mapa, Koi Carreon, Borg Sinaban, Paul Quiroga, Cristina Chua, Mico Dimagiba, Jules Gregorio.

Mythspace Volume 1 Coming from Visprint

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On March - 3 - 2014

Let’s kick off Mythspace month with a bang, shall we?

Team Mythspace is proud to announce that a compilation of the initial eight Mythspace issues (six stories in all) has been accepted for publication by none other than Visprint. We are honored to have met the standards of one of the best publishers in the country, and certainly one that cares about comics and speculative fiction. Mythspace Volume 1 is slated for release some time late this year, and we’re very excited to see our stories not only reach a wider audience, but to see our stories together: while each story is meant to stand alone, presenting all six in a single volume was always our goal.

The volume will not only be a compilation, but will feature some changes that we’ll be detailing in future posts, which will also deal with the future of Mythspace, and new projects from the team.We’ll also be having a few contests to celebrate the occasion, with the chance to win some great prizes — including the soon-to-disappear single issues of the series. The Summer Komikon will likely be the last convention that we’ll be selling the individual issues (although the same will still be available in comics stores while stocks last), so if you’re comics completionists, you may want to keep that in mind on April 12.

On behalf of myself, Koi Carreon, Tina Chua, Mico Dimagiba, Jules Gregorio, Paul Quiroga, and Borg Sinaban, thank you to Visprint, and to all our readers and supporters. We have lift off… but that only means the the journey has only begun!

Visprint Warehouse Sale 2013

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On October - 4 - 2013

It’s on, you guys! Visprint is, for my money, THE best Philippine print publisher (no bias, I swear), not just when it comes to speculative fiction and comics, but responsiveness to what readers want as well. The warehouse sale is a great way to get their titles at a discount. Here are the price lists. First for comics:

Then for everything else:

And here’s a map (and here’s the Google Maps version), followed by a few advisories from the good folk at Visprint:

IMPORTANT ADVISORY FOR THE WAREHOUSE SALE:

- Wala po kaming sapat na parking space. Residential area ang vicinity ng aming opisina kaya’t hindi po kami makakapag-allot ng parking area sa may mga dala ng sasakyan. Pasensiya na po.

- Hindi po airconditioned ang pagdadausan ng sale. Magdala ng pamaypay, payong at pamalit na damit

- Maging handa po tayo sa matinding init ng araw, o buhos ng ulan (alam niyo naman ang ating weather…)

- Sakali pong magkaroon ng matinding pagbuhos ng ulan, sigurado pong babaha sa lugar namin. Mapipilitan po kaming i-cancel ang sale para sa araw na yun para sa safety nating lahat. Ipo-post po namin dito sa aming FB, bago pa mag-9AM sakaling magkaroon ng biglaang pagbabago sa sched. SAKALI lang naman

- Ine-encourage po namin ang lahat ng mamimili na magdala ng sarili nilang bag para sa kanilang mga bibilhin. Wala po kaming plastic bags sa opisina.

Kala ninyo kayo lang ang excited?
KAMI RIN!!!

PS: eto po ang mapa ng aming lokasyon para sa mga tam—…este, walang panahon na mag-Google map
* Walking distance lang po mula EDSA, kanto ng Cabrera, papuntang Alcaver. Pramis, konting tumbling lang talaga.
* Sa mga sanay maglakad, walking distance lang din mula sa MRT station papunta sa aming opisina (average of 10mins.) Araw-araw po naming nilalakad ang rutang yan

Comics and Manga Workshop with Tintin Pantoja: September Batch

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On September - 17 - 2013

Awesome Filipina comics creator Tintin Pantoja (“Who is AC?“) sent me word that a new batch of her comics and manga creating workshops is starting this Saturday. Says Tintin: “This new eight-week session emphasis making short comics exercises, both your own and with partners. Projects will include jam comics, drawing in different styles, creating mini-comics, and more! By the end of the workshop, you’ll have a portfolio of stories to post on your website and to show off at the next Komikon. We’ll also develop original ideas for future long-form projects. Call 0928-5061046 or email tintinp@gmail.com for details.”

Selected Komiks Eligible for the 2013 Filipino Readers’ Choice Award

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On August - 22 - 2013

Tomorrow is the last day to nominate titles for the 2013 Filipino Readers’ Choice Awards, and I think that we can do better than four nominees in the comics category. REMEMBER, THE AWARDS ARE OPEN TO INDIE/SELF-PUBLISHED TITLES. That being said, maybe it’s hard to remember exactly which titles came out last year (and so are eligible for the awards) so I scrounged around the Internet and came up with this incomplete list, focusing on titles that I’ve at least heard of/seen, with links to a home page/ goodreads page/ preview/ or review. If you know of any others, please feel free to add them in the comments below.

And most of all — go nominate! You can nominate MULTIPLE titles, so no need to choose from amongst favorites.

EDIT: New Additions:

Mark 9verse47 by Tepai Pascual

Codename Bathala #2 by Jon Zamar and Judd Abinuman

Patintero, Book 1 by Kai Castillo

Talaan ng mga Aparisyon by Carlorozy Clemente

Juanderlandia by sirwen(pazin-tave komiks)

Ang Morion Book 1 by Wan Malinao Mañanita

Dalawang Liham #1 by Ronzkie Vidal

LikeMan by Rasel Reyes

Puso Negro Teaching Good Values Through Bad Conduct by JP Palabon

Windmills V by Josel Nicolas

ORIGINAL POST:

—-

Zsazsa Zaturnnah: Sa Kalakhang Maynila by Carlo Vergara – [Goodreads]

Crime Fighting Call Center Agents #3 by Noel Pascual and AJ Bernardo

Manila Accounts 1081: Good Criminals Wear White #1 by Wan Mañanita, Aaron Felizmenio, Alyssa Mortega, RH Quilantang

Kanto Inc. issue 4 by Joanah Tinio-Calingo, Taga-Ilog, Kilayman

Tatsulok: A Vision of Dust #1 by David Hontiveros and Xerx Javier

Ninja Girl Ko! indie special by Marco Dimaano and Kriss Sison

Angel Crush Vol.2 by Ace Vitangcol and Jed Siroy

Cubie ’n Bouncy by Jeciel Gaerlan

Bayan Knights: Nursery by Aaron Felizmenio, Donne Celadina, Jeff Benitez & Erico Calimlim

Bayan Knights #1 Heart of the Black Matrix by Donne Celadina, Erwin Ropa, and Renie Palo

Kamote Chunks #1 by CoRe Studios

Mukat #5 by Mel Casipit

Tiktik: The Aswang Chronicles  by Erik Matti – [Goodreads]

Pilandokomiks: Ang Tatlong Sumpa by Borg Sinaban – [Goodreads]

Callous Comics – On Lighter Dreams by Carlo Jose San Juan

Segovia Solutions #1 by Jerald Uy and Jether Amar

Sean #1  by Nicoy Guevarra

Luzviminda Issue 0 by Ray Magbanua

The New Adventures of Kapitan Tog by Freely Abrigo

Sigaw Komiks – by Dommy Abrigo and Freely Abrigo

Pinoy Rangers #0 by Gerilya: Sigmund Torre and Brandon Relucio

Mona: Queen of the Babes by Dark Chapel

The Hotdog Prince by Francis Martelino

Zombinoy #1-3 by Geonard Yleana and Sid Santos

And now, some titles that I was personally involved in:

Mythspace #0 by Paolo Chikiamco and Koi Carreon (with previews by Borg Sinaban, Mico Dimagiba, Jules Gregorio, Cristina Rose Chua and Paul Quiroga) – [Goodreads]

Kwentillion also came out last year, and I think that’s the first print appearance of Skygypsies by John Raymond Bumanglag & Timothy James Dimacali.

 

Event: The Owl Signing Event at Castle Geek

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On July - 12 - 2013

An invitation to you all from Lawrence Sol, and the Castle Geek team. Lawrence also mentions that: ” “Please note that this is the first time we will be raffling off a CGC 9.8 Yellow Label Series comic… Also, HKM will be giving out as a raffle prize an exact replica of this OWL script complete with sketches and annotations etc. Another first in the industry!”

After months of anticipation, CASTLE GEEK brings you DYNAMITE SUPERSTAR – Heubert Khan Michael for another signing event, this time for this new book – THE OWL!

THE OWL

(W) J. T. Krul 
(A) Hubert Khan Michael 
(CA) Alex Ross

Fear the shadows, the Owl has returned! Lost for 50 years in an ethereal limbo, the Owl has come back to find a violent and desperate world of strangers. The woman he loved is gone, but he remains determined to continue his fight for justice. Can the Owl withstand the challenges awaiting him… or will this new reality crush his body and spirit?

Catch him at CASTLE GEEK Glorietta on Saturday, July 20, 1:00PM, have your copies signed, and your blank covers sketched!

Plus! CASTLE GEEK presents to you the grandest raffle prize yet!

WIN!

ONE (1) CGC Graded, Yellow Label, Sketched Blank Cover by Heubert Khan Michael (courtesy of our friend Jun Pamintuan) 

ONE (1) Official Replica of THE OWL Script complete with Artist Sketches on the pages!

SKETCH MECHANICS:

- There will be SIX (6) Slots for Heubert Khan Michael at P500 (one character only)
- Sketch slots will be given to those who have purchased the book
– Sketches will be on a first come first served basis and will only be done in Blank Cover Variants bought on that day.
- No reservation of sketches allowed.

RAFFLE MECHANICS:

- For every P1000 purchase of DYNAMITE COMICS that includes Heubert Khan Michael’s THE OWL you get ONE (1) Raffle Coupon.

- Once drawn, winners must be present to claim their prize.

- Raffle of items will start at 5:00PM

And there’s more!

 

ONE DAY SALE!

Back Issue Bins at P100 each! (DC, Marvel, Image, Vertigo, and all other publishers)
CGC GRADED COMICs at 30% OFF!

Complete Sets at 20% OFF!

Join us together with other DYNAMITE Artist for this momentous event happening only at CASTLE GEEK Glorietta!

Tabi Po to be Published by Visprint in 2014

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On July - 4 - 2013

A big congratulations to Mervin Malonzo, friend of the blog and illustrator of Alternative Alamat, for nabbing a print book contract with Visprint for his aswang opus, Tabi Po. He chronicles his path to publication here. If you want to read the webcomic before the book comes out (it’s in Filipino — there are paid ebook editions in English available on Amazon) then head here. The quality of the comic has always been high, but it’s been improving as it nears its climax, and no, I’m not just saying that because I’ve been helping with the editing :)

Then and Now: Freedom of Speech via the Philippine Daily Inquirer

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On June - 6 - 2013

At present, it seems Pugad Baboy creator Pol Medina, Jr. is being penalized for the above comics strip (suspended, or fired, it’s not yet clear). For context, head over to Komikero.com.

I don’t want to talk about how the way PDI has reacted to the strip perpetuates the dangerous and malignant impression that homosexuality is somehow a slur, nor how their singling out Medina for punishment when the strip was approved by their editors is incoherent and inequitable. I doubt anything I say will be met by anything but a bland “thank you for your comments :D ” from their social media team. What I do want to do is let PDI talk to itself, in a sense.

These are statements that the Philippine Daily Inquirer editorial team has published or allowed to be published in their newspaper, on the topic of Freedom of Speech. Take them as you will.

“Who should go to prison for speaking his mind? In the modern democratic project, the answer is clear: No one. The conviction of social activist Carlos Celdran for the obscure crime of “offending the religious feelings,” then, raises many questions. Is the Philippines a modern democracy? Is freedom of speech a living civic virtue? Are religious feelings (not even religious beliefs or articles of faith, but the much more ambiguous notion of religious feelings) sufficient to block political dissent or free expression?” — Editorial, “Notoriously Offensive,” 1/31/2013. Read more: http://opinion.inquirer.net/46003/notoriously-offensive#ixzz2VQg6vEgG

“The first fallacy is the view that if many people find it offensive, then it can be censored. Susmaryopsep. That’s precisely why we have the Bill of Rights! It protects, in the words of Oliver Wendell Holmes, “not free thought for those who agree with us but freedom for the thought that we hate.”” — Raul C. Pangalangan, “Freedom for the Thought We Hate,” 8/11/2011. Read more: http://opinion.inquirer.net/9801/%e2%80%98freedom-for-the-thought-we-hate%e2%80%99#ixzz2VQgZTQl3

“The test of a society’s commitment to freedom of expression lies in its defense of marginalized forms of speech. I say in class, free speech is for speech that you hate, not for speech that you like. The logic of the principle is simple: we don’t need to protect society’s treasured ideas and institutions—they pose no danger to us; we pose no danger to them. It is for those forms of expression that disturb, offend, and even anger us that we actually need freedom of expression, as these types of speech are those in danger of being suppressed if society were not serious enough about a democratic culture.” — Florin T. Hilbay, “The crucible of free speech,” 8/15/2011. Read more: http://opinion.inquirer.net/9981/the-crucible-of-free-speech#ixzz2VQh0oLbE

“If any citizen is free to openly agree, but not to openly disagree, then freedom of expression does not prevail. An individual’s option to openly express disagreement without risk of any personal injury is a key part of the definition of a free society.” — Mahar Mangahas, “Disagreement and Freedom,” 3/3/2012. Read more: http://opinion.inquirer.net/24193/disagreement-and-freedom#ixzz2VQhRMnVM

Who Is Tintin? An Interview with Tintin Pantoja

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On April - 11 - 2013
Filipina artist Tintin Pantoja will be at this Saturday’s Summer Komikon from 4-5 pm to launch “Who is AC?“, a new graphic novel illustrated by her and written by Eisner-award winning creator Hope Larson.
In this breakthrough graphic novel from the award-winning author of Mercury, there’s a new superhero in town—and she’s got kick-butt cyberpowers.

Meet Lin, a formerly average teenage girl whose cell phone zaps her with magical powers. But just as superpowers can travel through the ether, so can evil. As Lin starts to get a handle on her new abilities (while still observing her curfew!), she realizes she has to go head-to-head with a nefarious villain who spreads his influence through binary code. And as if that weren’t enough, a teen blogger has dubbed her an “anonymous coward!” Can Lin detect the cyber-criminal’s vulnerability, save the day, and restore her reputation?

With ingenious scripting from graphic novel phenom Hope Larson and striking art from manga illustrator Tintin Pantoja, this action-packed story brims with magical realism and girl-power goodness.

Tintin spared some time to talk to me a little about magical girls, comic workshops, and fandoms.
Q: “Who is AC?”, your new graphic novel with Hope Larson, has been described as “Who Is AC? is a love letter to the magical girls of shojo manga and anime…” Did you watch magical girl shows growing up? Who were your favorites?

As a kid I would watch SailorMoon dubbed into Indonesian, not really knowing what was going on but loving the characters and the show all the same. I’ve also seen some Card Captor Sakura (but more of the comic than the anime). I also got into a lot of western shows with magical girl elements, like Rainbow Brite and My Little Pony ( the eighties series).
Q: What do you think it is about the idea of the “magical girl” that makes it such a popular genre, especially with teens?

I think teens like seeing someone who’s their age, with their own experiences, exhibiting special powers and saving the world. Magical girls are just a feminine iteration of the superhero- emphasis on magic, romance, and of course, outfits and the relationships between characters. In popular culture, a lot of which is devoted to the heroic exploits of male characters, it’s nice to have a genre in which girls can be the star and save the world through strength and love.
Q: How did you come by this project? What’s it like working with Hope Larson?

I came by this project online. Hope was looking for an artist, and I volunteered my portfolio. She’s great to work with- very upfront about what she wants, and very clear. She sent me the script, and I was pretty much free to interpret it visually. She’s also been very supportive in other ways.
Q: You  graduated from the School of Visual Arts in New York, and now you’re based here. Why did you choose to come back and work from here, as opposed to staying in the United States?

Honestly, it’s hard to stay in New York and not already a permanent resident or citizen, especially if you’re an artist.

Q: You’ve begun teaching a Comics and Manga Workshop here in Metro Manila. Why’d you decide to put up the workshop?
The workshop is only on a dry run right now. I hope to offer it to students during the school year on a weekly weekend basis. I just went online looking for comic schools and didn’t find any, so I thought it might be a good niche to fill, if people were  interested in learning to make comics I don’t know if Elbert Or’s workshop is still ongoing? It might be nice to trade notes with him, if he is. Anyway, a couple of my Indonesian friends put up comic/manga schools in Jakarta and I thought it might be a fun thing to do here. If anyone’s interested in the comic workshop, it’s a two-hour eight/nine-session program in which we make a short comic from script to final coloring/ tones. Email me at tintinp@gmail.com! ;) The first MWF summer sessions starts April 12!
Q: While everyone learns how to create in their own way, what are the benefits that you think a classroom-based workshop has to offer, that would be unavailable to an aspiring creator working on his/her craft alone?

The classroom setup automatically forces you to do the comic itself. A lot of creators- including myself- have a hard time motivating ourselves to work. So in a classroom, you’re automatically being obligated to make your stuff. Also, making comics is so solitary. It’s more fun to be working in a setting where people can learn from each other and encourage each other. It’s true that comics can easily be self-taught. What I want is to make the comics process more social, regular, and enjoyable for the individual creator.
Q: What’s your favorite part of the creative process?

Definitely the inking, when all of the hard work ( thumbnailing and pencilling) have been done!
Q: I read in an old interview that you liked to listen to stories while working. What have you been listening to lately?
I used to listen to online radio shows on the BBC and NPR websites, but mostly I just turn the TV station to the Crime Channel these days, or when inking, catch up on HBO shows like True Blood.
Q: What works/fandoms are you passionate about at the moment? Anything you’re looking forward to picking up for yourself at the Komikon?

At the moment my biggest fandom is the TV show Supernatural ( my favorite character is Castiel), and Adventure Time- but with Fionna and Cake. As for Komikon, I’m very much looking forward to picking up anything new from Mel Casipit- he’s a great artist and I’ve been following his career. I also love discovering new local cartoonists and finding something really unique and cool.
Q: What’s next for you, after “Who is AC?”

I have no idea. the future’s kinda wide open at this point. I don’t really have plans or ongoing projects.

 

Words and Pictures at Play: An Interview with Elbert Or

Posted by Paolo Chikiamco On April - 8 - 2013
Writer/artist/creator Elbert Or is one of the special guests at this Saturday’s Summer Komikon 2013. where he will be launching his first Bakemono High compilation. I’ve known Elbert for a while, and he’s one of the most creative and driven people in Philippine comics, and he graciously agreed to sit down and talk about Bakemono High, his creative process, and comics for younger readers. He also gives us an exclusive: a colored version of a 2 page Bakemono High story that appears in black and white in the compilation.
Q: Thanks for your time Elbert! For those readers who don’t know your work, can you tell us a bit about your work in comics? You’ve certainly amassed quite a body of work through the years.
Sure thing! Let’s see…if I had to put together a bullet list of highlights, it’ll maybe be something like this:
  • Four years in college spent creating and peddling photocopied comics, at a time when there weren’t a lot of venues and opportunities to sell them. I also ran a comics org in Ateneo for a couple years.
  • Convinced my comics literature professor Jamie Bautista to try his hand at making his own comics. He ended up forming Nautilus Comics with me as the first employee, and over the course of a couple years released National Book Award-winning anthologies Siglo: FreedomSiglo: Passion, and the popular teen series Cast. I also contributed to various anthologies.
  • Conducted comics workshops across the country in an attempt to provide aspiring creators with opportunities that weren’t available to me when I was starting out, and eventually opened a comics creation elective in Ateneo.
  • Worked with various publishers like Anvil Publishing, Tahanan Books, Psicom Publishing, Milflores Publishing to try and open the doors for comics.
  • Worked with foreign publishers, from Chuang Yi in Singapore to Archaia Press and Oni Press in the U.S. The most prominent of these is the YALSA-winning Lola: A Ghost Story, which I illustrated for J. Torres.
  • Through all these, I created material across a range of genres too, from superhero stories (Jet Titanium, Super Space Ranger), to adventure stories for young girls (The Many Adventures of Stephanie Smee) to shonen manga-style stories (Card Battler Teks) to this one, Bakemono High.
Q: You’ll be at the Summer Komikon with a compilation of you Bakemono High comic. Again, for those unfamiliar with is K-Zone run, can you tell us what Bakemono High is all about?
Bakemono High is set in a school for monsters, and mostly follows three friends — Max, a vampire who’s a stickler for rules; Chuck, a werewolf who likes adventure almost as much as he likes food; and Amy, a mummy who’s a boy named sort of like a girl and is deathly afraid of everything!
Q: You’ve mentioned that there’s a lot of never-before-seen content in this compilation — around 30%. What can old readers look forward to in these new strips?
I don’t know if that’s a lot, but yeah, there’s some strips there that haven’t been published. If anything though, the biggest thing is that the cover says “book one,” which for me is an inherent promise that there will be a book two. And if all goes well, that’ll be out as soon as October. With 100% new content!

Q: So it’s true then — you’ll be continuing the series in the future?

I plan on continuing the series in the future, and have actually started work on the next book. What I’m discovering is that when it was being serialized in K-Zone, I was restricted to mostly one- to two-page installments, and I wanted to be sure they were self-contained but still be meaty enough story-wise. That meant compressing a lot of material into a small amount of space. With this new format, I’m letting myself — and the stories — breathe a bit more. Bigger panels to show off the art, or even just being able to dwell on the smaller character moments instead of speeding from one plot point to the next. It’s all getting me quite excited and reinvigorated as the creator!
Q: You are both a writer and an artist. Does one role or the other come more naturally to you? Or, perhaps, are they inseparable to you?
They’re actually quite inseparable, and if you look at my notes, whether they’re for comics projects or even for my day-to-day life tasks and work meetings, they’re littered with words and pictures playing with each other. I guess that’s really just how my mind works!
Q: What comics did you read as a child?
I read a lot of Tintin, Archie, Calvin and Hobbes, Dragonball Z, and Funny Komiks! Thinking about it now, that’s actually a healthy range of comics material don’t you think? Haha! It’s like a United Nations of Comics! I want to say it’s by design, that I’m reading Eurocomics beside American comics and newspaper strips beside Japanese and Filipino comics, but really I was just consuming whatever I could get my hands on!
Q: Does anything change, in your artistic process, in creating a book aimed at children, as opposed to one aimed at a more general audience?
I think if anything I tend to think more visually when I’m writing all-ages material. Lots of moments where I would either use a specific image in my head as a starting point for the story, or “This would look cool!”
On the other hand, for some reason, I find that I think more in terms of dialogue when writing more mature stuff. It’s not something I’m really conscious about though; really this is the first time I’ve had to articulate it! Do kids and younger characters just go and do, while adults like to talk things out? Is that how I see things? I don’t know what that says about me!
Q: What advice can you give comics creators in general, and those who want to make stories for children in particular?
In general, I always tell aspiring creators to stop aspiring and start creating. If you want to be a writer, write! If you want to be an artist, draw! The only way you get better at making comics is by keeping on using them. Just like muscles!
As for specific advice…well, it almost doesn’t matter if you’re making stories for kids or for adults: you have to write something that is true to yourself. It may be true to who you are now, or it may be something that is true to the 10-year old you, but it has to be true to some version of you.
I’m not talking about facts, I’m talking perspective. Wiser men have said, “don’t talk down to kids when you’re writing for them,” and that’s true: I don’t know about you, but when I was a kid, I could tell when some adults were trying to pull my leg, and telling me something that I know just isn’t true! (If you don’t finish your ampalaya, people in Africa will die from hunger!) On the other hand, I also can remember believing in things that were just outright, boldfaced lies, all because I admired or loved the people who said them! (Your school is built on a graveyard and it’s haunted by spooky ghosts!)

Q: What types of stories would you like to see more of, from the local comics industry?

I don’t know what I want to see more of, specifically, because what I really want to see is something I’ve never seen before, something fresh and exciting!

What I’m sure I want to see less of though are fantasy comics with characters wearing bahags and tikbalangs and manananggals. Surely there are more creatures of folklore than that! I realize we have a rich history and tradition of folk literature, and there will always be a place for that, but right now, I’m really just at the point where I want to see the future right here, right now.
And now, an exclusive colored comic preview of Bakemono High!

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Rocket Kapre is an imprint of Eight Ray Sun Publishing Inc. (a new Philippine-based publisher), dedicated to bringing the very best of Philippine Speculative Fiction in English to a worldwide audience by means of digital distribution. More info can be found at our About section at the top of the page.

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